Thursday, April 30, 2009

The Laughlin Run....

Last weekend we bombed out the the Laughlin Moto Run....This year the attendence was pretty low over all. Comparing to last year it was almost half the people. What they lacked in attendence, they made up with bazillions of Cops.

We left LA about 4pm and got into Bullhead City about 10pm. We had four bikes on the way out, all but me with ladies on the back (Janine couldn't make it), so we had a lot of stops and dicking around which was fine by me. I don't like making the long journeys at night...There really is no scenery once the sun is all the way down. The new bars are much more comfortable than I expected.



Met up with the rest of the folks and ended up having 12 bikes and 16 people all staying with Jason's dad Clem...We had some great rides while out there. My favorite was up to Oatman, and over the mountain. Minus the donkeys in the roads, the hundreds of cops watching every single thing that goes on (busting fools for two miles over the speed limit), a few head on crashes of people who don't belong on bikes, and the heat, it as a great trip. No mishaps through our group, everyone road safe, no breakdowns and tons of beer. Good times, good times.

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

RIP Brad...

April 29, 1992...there was a riot in the streets tell me where were you?

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

BOLD CABALLEROS Y NOBLE BANDIDAS



I haven't been yet, but the exhibit looks amazing. Janine and I are going to check this out before it leaves town.

Steady bandito steeze.

http://www.autrynationalcenter.org/boldcaballeros/revolution.php


Here is a brief description:


All over the world, stories and folktales are told about certain bandits who stand for social justice. Often, the popular mind converts real historical figures such as Tiburcio Vásquez and the leaders of the Mexican Revolution of 1910 into folk heroes. In other cases, popular culture shapes distinct and more satisfying characters out of historical composites, like Robin Hood or Joaquín Murrieta. Sometimes fictional bandit heroes, such as Zorro, the Cisco Kid, and the Bandit Queen, fill a social and cultural need. These characters assume a vitality that often penetrates all of popular media, including film, art, costume, radio, television, and the commercial world of children's products.
This exhibition focuses on the Latino experience and the interplay of fact and fantasy in the depiction of Latina and Latino "noble bandits."

Monday, April 06, 2009

Getting there...

 


The bike has been on the rack for about a month....major overhaul getting it ready for Laughlin. Should be done by next weekend.
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